Tag: wild food

Spring Dessert: Nettle and Honey Cake with Gorse Flower Syrup

Spring Dessert: Nettle and Honey Cake with Gorse Flower Syrup

Five years ago I wrote a blog about my Nettle and Honey Cake – it went down a treat. Named as; ‘the best I’ve ever had’ by one enthusiastic forager, it was one of my many ideas I was actually able to follow through with […]

Why I love Stinging Nettles  (A little film footage!)

Why I love Stinging Nettles (A little film footage!)

I’ve been teaching foraging for a while now (over 10 years), and I’ve just come across some old film footage of me introducing stinging nettles (Urtica dioica). Oooh, we were all younger then, weren’t we! Nettles remains one of my favourite wild greens, especially in […]

Making Nettle Pakoras

Making Nettle Pakoras

stivesscreenprint

Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica) are one of my favourite spring greens, and this was a recipe I shared with Graham Pullen of St Ives Screen Printing at Tom’s Yard. Graham is keen on making art affordable and accessible, and has incorporated the recipe into one of his hand-printed individual cards.

I love both Graham’s botanical drawing of the humble nettle, and his interpretation into print.

The last time I made this recipe was for my friend’s birthday last spring. We had a ‘bring a contribution’ curry dinner and the range of curries, samosas and spiced breads was great. These nettle pakoras fitted in perfectly. The only down-side was my dog sneakily finishing off the cooking oil. Trust me, you don’t want to know the end of that part of the story.

Urtica dioicaStinging nettle recipe (Urtica dioica)

The fourth time I made them was when I ran a nettle day at Bramble Cottage. It was great having a 6 month old, budding forager with us, gurgling, watching and smelling the various stages of the process. Perhaps that’s where this nursery rhythm tune came from, finding a soothing way to give a little extra information about the humble stinging nettles.

You can watch the process and hear the song in this video; ‘Making Nettle Pakoras’ below. The reason for the song lyrics is explained in my blog When NOT to eat Stinging Nettles, yet the song is self-explanatory really, so just watch and listen…

 

The recipe?

Do get in touch with Graham, and he can show you, sell you or tell you where to get a great range of foraging recipe cards, including this one with the full recipe. For more ideas, why not browse my Stinging nettles blog. Nettles are regularly included in my wild food foraging courses too.

The Lessons of Making Gorse Flower Fudge

The Lessons of Making Gorse Flower Fudge

Gorse Flower Fudge Oh my god, I had such hopes with this recipe, I really thought I’d clinched it first time (which happens occasionally, though is definitely not a given). Heating it slowly, the smell of the gorse flowers was divine and the flavour of […]

What’s Wild, Yellow and Subtle?

What’s Wild, Yellow and Subtle?

I warn you, this might be a blog with questions. I did wonder what to make the title, it could have been; what’s yellow, subtle with a crisp outer and soft centre? Though it sounded too much like a chocolate advert. Here’s the answer, a […]

A Forager’s Dog – Paddy foraging Blackberries

A Forager’s Dog – Paddy foraging Blackberries

 

I have a foraging dog. He’s called Paddy McGinity (a name I inherited rather than gifted to him), and yes, he can climb rocks and cliffs as agile as a goat.

Most of the time my dog is with me on forays, while I forage and teach up to 100 different species of wilds in the UK. Often, he’s doing his own thing (chasing rabbits and exploring), though sometimes he hangs around and is inquisitive.

I’ve watched him ‘watch and learn’ to forage blackberries, rosehips, acorns and he’s good at apple scrumping. Seaweeds aren’t so popular with him, expect Kelp stems and fish, crab and rabbit are favourites, naturally.

Actually, many are surprised how many fruits and vegetables he’ll eat – celery and cabbage leaves being the exception, though cabbage stems are a hit! I’ve watched him sneakily remove broccoli from my friend’s bag, gobbled tomatoes from crates, and forage raspberries straight off a friend’s allotment (sorry Liz). To me it makes sense; a natural diet of fruit, vegetables, meat and fish. Unfortunately he’s not that selective, and easily succumbs to bread, sugar and fat (not dis-similar to us!).

He’s eaten many other wilds over the years too, mostly be default when he’s foraged (I’d say stolen) food from my kitchen. Nettle and Lemon energy balls he devoured very quickly, as were the second batch (very frustrating), Hogweed Seed Biscuits were a hit too, Alexander Seeded Bread is gulped easily and Elderflower ice cream has been ogled at, but so far I have been able to keep it away from him.

Such a sweet dog.

Of course, though he’s also an instinctual animal, a wild beast, an opportunist and a forager. Not dis-similar to us, though he is more closely connected to his wild roots. We have lots to learn from animals, and unfortunately they have lots to learn from us!

picking seaweeds from a rock pool

How to Make Gorse Scented Butter

How to Make Gorse Scented Butter

I’ve always considered myself an artist rather than a scientist, and heaven help me if I had to make cakes for a living; I’m far too much of a slow, pondering and inventive cook to make any money from it. I do have some successes […]

Gorse Flower and Sargassum Seaweed Foccacia

Gorse Flower and Sargassum Seaweed Foccacia

Part of the fun of foraging for me is coming home with a wonderful choice of unusual ingredients to cook and create with, or drying them to use another day. In my kitchen pretty much anything goes, of course there have been disasters along the […]

Rosehip and Custard Tart

Rosehip and Custard Tart

Sometimes I feel creative, sometimes crazy, with the ideas I come up with for using wild food. This one is a complete labour of love; a custard tart topped with rosehips and a rosehip syrup glaze. Devoured by 14 appreciative people on a hazy October afternoon.

Here’s the recipe;

Rosehip Fruit and Custard Tart

 Ingredients (for pastry base)

  • 200g plain flour
  • 100g cold butter, cubed
  • 20g ground almonds
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1-4 tbsp cold water
  • a little egg white
For custard filling
  • 320ml whole milk
  • 80g unrefined caster sugar
  • 5 free-range eggs yolks (freeze the egg
  • 25g cornflour, mixed to a paste with a little cold water
For the topping and glaze
  • 200ml rosehip syrup
  • 2 tbsp cornflour
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • 100g rosehips, fresh out the freezer

In a large bowl, add the flour, ground almonds and baking powder, mix well and rub in the butter until it resembles breadcrumbs. Mix in the the beaten egg and 1-tablespoon at a time of cold water (just enough to bind the dough, no more). Alternatively you can blend the mixture in a food processor, adding the water at the end. Press the dough into a ball, wrap in clingfilm and chill in the fridge for at least 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 200C and grease a 23cm diameter flan tin.

For the filling, in a medium saucepan bring the milk to the boil, whisking all the time. Remove from the heat and in a medium bowl, beat the sugar and egg yolks for 3-5 minutes, or until the mixture falls in thick ribbons from the whisk. Slowly whisk in the cornflour paste until well combined. Slowly pour in the hot milk, stirring in well, before returning the mixture back into the saucepan. Heat the mixture, whisking constantly, until boiling. Cook for a further minute, then pour the mixture into a bowl and set aside to cool for 10 minutes. Cover with clingfilm and chill in the fridge.

Roll the pastry out on a floured work surface to about ½ cm thick and line the flan tin. Brush the pastry with a little egg white to seal it and bake in the oven for 15 minutes or until the pastry is golden-brown and crisp. Let the pastry cool a little, then carefully transfer to a wire rack. At this stage the cooked pastry can be covered and stored for a few days before using.

For the glaze, heat half the rosehip syrup in a saucepan until boiling then remove the pan from the heat. Dissolve the cornflour in the remaining syrup and quickly pour the mixture back into the saucepan, returning to the heat, stirring all the time, until the mixture has thickened. Next add the honey, bring back to the boil and remove the pan from the heat. Set aside to cool. When ready to assemble the tart, spoon in the custard filling, and with a sharp knife, carefully slice the ends off the rosehips, then slice them in half, lengthways and scoop out the ball of seeds with a teaspoon. Place the rosehips on top of the custard, cut-side down. Transfer the glaze to a pouring jug and drizzle over the glaze. Chill in the fridge until ready to serve.

Foraging, Yoga and a Paleo Diet

Foraging, Yoga and a Paleo Diet

It is hard to make generalisations about what the appeal of foraging is for 21st century folk, already living in a pre-dominantly digital and comfortable world. There will, of course, be various reasons why people choose to seek out their own, hard to reach food […]