Tag: stinging nettles

Making Nettle Beer

Making Nettle Beer

I’ve never really got on with making alcohol. As much as I like processes, (I tend to think that people are either predominantly process or goal orientated), whether it is wine or beer, I seem to lack the knack of transforming weeds into a fermented […]

The Best Nettle Syrup Recipe

The Best Nettle Syrup Recipe

I recently went out for a meal at a restaurant and they had wild nettle cordial on the drinks menu. Ooh, as a forager with a soft spot for ‘sweet’ I just had to try it. I must say, I was disappointed. I even asked […]

Spring Dessert: Nettle and Honey Cake with Gorse Flower Syrup

Spring Dessert: Nettle and Honey Cake with Gorse Flower Syrup

Urtica dioica

Five years ago I wrote a blog about my Nettle and Honey Cake – it went down a treat. Named as; ‘probably the best cake I’ve ever had’ by one enthusiastic forager, I was super pleased the result.

Every so often I like to repeat recipes so I can enjoy the flavours again and see if they need tweaking. Over the last few years I’ve also found that nettles combines well with ginger and with lemon and, although this cake contains neither, its texture is reminiscent of a lovely moist ginger cake.

Last week, however, I made a new discovery; nettle cake (urtica dioica) and gorse (ulex gallii, ulex europaeus) flower syrup! It’s a wild and divine combination which I just had to share with you.

Urtica dioica Urtical dioica

A Spring Dessert: Nettle and Honey Cake with Gorse Flower Syrup

An almost toffee flavoured, moist, not too sweet cake, with a sweet hit of moorland gorse flavours drizzled over it. Somehow, this whole combination reminds me of green tea, perhaps it is the lovingly received health benefits of these local, wild ingredients, or just the natural flavours of green nettles and infused gorse.

Ingredients 

  • 50-75 g nettle tops
  • 250 g clear honey
  • 100 g dark muscovado sugar
  • 225 g butter
  • 3 large eggs beaten
  • 300 g white flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder

For the syrup

  • 50 g fresh gorse flowers
  • 225 g unrefined sugar
  • 300 ml water

Place the gorse flowers in a medium saucepan with the water and sugar and bring to the boil. Immediately take off the heat, cover with a lid and leave overnight (or for as many hours as you can). The next day bring the liquid to the boil again and simmer for 10 minutes. Strain through a fine sieve or muslin cloth and store in sterilised bottles in the fridge or freeze in ice cube containers and defrost as needed. Will last a month or so if not frozen.

Line a 20 cm square or round cake tin and pre-heat the oven to 150°C. Steam the nettles for 5 minutes and put aside to cool. Place the honey, sugar and butter in a small saucepan over a low heat and stir until melted and combined. Once the nettles are cooled, blend with the eggs to make a smooth, green pulp. Sieve the flour and baking powder into a large bowl and gradually beat in the melted sugar and butter mix. It will resemble a lovely toffee colour.

urtica dioicaUrtica dioica

Pour in the pureed nettles and blended eggs and beat together.

Urtica dioica

It makes a wonderful green, raw cake mixture colour! Pour into the cake tin and bake for an hour, or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean, or the cake springs back when touched. Allow to cool for a few minutes before removing from the tin onto a cooling rack, and cool completely before slicing. Serve with gorse flower syrup.

Urtica dioicaUrtica dioica

Read more about Stinging Nettles for food, and I’ve many blogs about Gorse Flowers including recipes too.

Why I love Stinging Nettles  (A little film footage!)

Why I love Stinging Nettles (A little film footage!)

I’ve been teaching foraging for a while now (over 10 years), and I’ve just come across some old film footage of me introducing stinging nettles (Urtica dioica). Oooh, we were all younger then, weren’t we! Nettles remains one of my favourite wild greens, especially in […]

Making Nettle Pakoras

Making Nettle Pakoras

Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica) are one of my favourite spring greens, and this was a recipe I shared with Graham Pullen of St Ives Screen Printing at Tom’s Yard. Graham is keen on making art affordable and accessible, and has incorporated the recipe into one […]

It’s Cornish Nettle Soup Time!

It’s Cornish Nettle Soup Time!

It is spring, the time for going nettling!

 

I wait and wait for this moment in spring. Last week I passed a huge patch of stinging nettles (urtica dioica), looking all lovely and ready to pick. It’s hard to explain, but when they’re really ready their presence changes, they become more vibrant looking and start to wink at me.

 

 

Now I can call my neighbour, don strong gardening gloves and we can go nettle picking. Blackberry picking is so… autumn, this is spring, the time for nettles! All the nutritional benefits of nettling I discuss on my spring foraging courses and I have so much more to share on nettles, including recipes and when not to pick them. You can browse this information here on my Stinging nettles blog.

 

Just like blackberrying, picking nettles would have been a seasonal affair, gathering nutritious greens that even children would have devoured. Many people have heard of nettle soup, but  have you actually tried it? It doesn’t taste of spinach, it tastes of nettles which is even better. Go find your gardening gloves…

 

When I was researching for my first book; Wild Food Foraging in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly I came across an old recipe Cornish recipe for Nettle soup. It included sausages and was boiled for an hour. An hour! No, not I, in these modern times I thought I could make a much tastier, fresher one, and I did. The recipe is in my foraging book.

Happy nettling!

 

Summer Virtues of Stinging Nettles

Summer Virtues of Stinging Nettles

I’m writing this  blog in summer – not a time to eat stinging nettles (urtica dioica), despite the Dorset Nettle Eating Competition held every July (read the important information on When Not to Eat Nettles to find out why not).  However, nettles have many other virtues beyond […]

When NOT to Eat Stinging Nettles

When NOT to Eat Stinging Nettles

You may know, that I rate Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica) highly. I believe they are one of our most nutritious greens in the UK alongside the goosefoot family which includes Fat Hen (Chenopodium album), Good King Henry (Chenopodium bonus-henricus) and Oraches (Atriplex patula and Atriplex […]

A Dozen Ways to Cook a Stinging Nettle

A Dozen Ways to Cook a Stinging Nettle

Nettles are amazing – nutritious, versatile and abundant.

Never under-estimate the humble stinging nettle (urtica dioica) it’s one of the best wild greens we have (nettles  contain iron, vitamin c, protein and so, so much more). Really we should and could be celebrating, and using this wonderful plant a lot more.

Thank you nettles, and here’s some ideas for appreciating nettles with your taste buds and nutritionally craving bodies.

*Cooking stinging nettles removes their sting.

Nettle Soup, Nettle Bhajis

Nettle Omlette, Nettle and Potato Curry.

I like all these recipes; soup is delicious, the bhajis tasty and surprising, the omlette simple and the curry, a perfect accompaniment to an indian style meal.

Nettle pesto (try and stop eating this one!), Nettle lasagne

Nettle Beer (just a 3 day process!) and cooking nettles for either beer or syrup.

Making Nettle Pasta, Rachel Lambert’s Nettle and Honey Cake (delicious!!)

Just cooked as a side vegetable, and last but not least, fresh nettle tea (just pop a nettle top or 3 in the teapot and leave to brew).

Happy cooking and topping yourself up with wild nutrition from this fantastic plant.

I share lots more tips and recipes for nettles on my;

Photos: By Rachel Lambert, except Beer and cooking nettles by Dan Thomas.

My Five Top Spring Wild Foods

My Five Top Spring Wild Foods

Spring is exciting – a combination of warmth and light gets plants, animals and human-animals going. Sometimes, for me, too going. The term mad march hare feels too close to home for me, as I prance around the hedgerows picking wild greens as if there […]