Rachel Lambert: forager, author, guide
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Scoop of creamy homemade ice ceram with foraged elderflowers

It was salty lips and a refreshing, post swim sup of elderflower cordial that moved me to create this. Even as I write, in my mind’s eye I can still see the coastal horizon and taste the combination of sweet elderflower and salt. The ice cream is rather good too, and perfect if you crave the sea but live inland.

Summer foraging course picking elderflowers with Rachel Lambert

Since writing this, I also discovered a lovely gin and elderflower ice cream that I enjoyed courtesy of Bruichladdich distillery. It was divine! I may not have managed to recreate that one, but this recipe is equally enjoyable, even without the alcohol!

Elderflower gin ice cream - a forager's delight!

Elderflower and Sea Salt Ice Cream recipe

Serves 6

Ingredients

  • 2 free-range egg yolks
  • 185 ml elderflower cordial
  • 35 g (2 tbsp) unrefined sugar
  • 500 ml lightly whipped cream (approx. 425 ml double cream, before whipped)
  • ½ - ¾ tsp rock salt, lightly crushed

In a medium to large bowl whisk the egg yolks until light and fluffy. In a small heavy bottomed saucepan add the cordial (less the 2 teaspoons) and the sugar and stir over a medium heat until the sugar has dissolved. Bring to a rolling boil and using a sugar thermometer allow to reach 110°C or until a metal spoon dipped in the syrup forms thin threads from the last drops. Slowly pour the syrup into the eggs and whisk constantly, add the rest of the cordial and continue to whisk until the mixture thickens and resembles a mousse.

Making homemade ice cream with foraged elderflowers from a wild food course

Spoon into a one litre Tupperware or tin, cover and freeze for one hour. If you haven’t already, roughly crush the salt in a pestle and mortar – you want small pieces of rock salt, but not dust. After an hour take the semi-frozen ice cream out of the freezer, thoroughly stir in the salt and freeze until ready to use. Remove from the freezer 10 minutes before serving, lovely with summer fruits.

Picking elderflowers on a wild food foraging course

The light flavour of pears matches the summer scent of elderflowers perfectly in this delicious elderflower and pear jam! I've made it in jam sandwiches for participants on my summer foraging courses and bespoke forays. I also love it in my double elderflower doughnuts.

So let me get straight to the point and share this recipe with you.

Oh, though don't forget I have a whole Elder section on my blog with lots of recipes for elderflowers and elderberries!

Spoon of foraged elderflower jam

Elderflower and Pear Jam recipe

If you already have elderflower cordial, you can make this jam anytime of year. It goes perfectly with cheese and crackers. Though to be honest, I solely made it as a filling for my elderflower doughnuts. There I feel it has found its perfect home, or hole.

Picking elderflowers on a wild food foraging course

HOT TIP: Remember to pick your elderflowers on a warm, dry day and remember elder is a tree and not a plant. Why not come on a wild food foraging course and learn more about how to identify and use wild foods

Makes one 350-430 g jar

Ingredients

  • 300 g peeled pears, stalk and pips removed
  • 90 ml (6 tbsp) elderflower cordial
  • 225 g golden granulated sugar

Chop and blend the pears with the elderflower cordial then place the blended, syrupy fruits in a small saucepan with the sugar. Simmer and stir to dissolve the sugar. Using a jam thermometer turn the heat up to medium/high until the jam reaches 105°C or thickens to jam consistency. Be careful not to burn the bottom. Pour into a large sterilised jar and allow to cool before sealing.

Delicious in Elderflower doughnuts or on toast.

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