Tag: edible seaweed

Tasty Dulse Seaweed Soda Bread (Gluten-free)

Tasty Dulse Seaweed Soda Bread (Gluten-free)

No, I’m not gluten-free, though this recipe for Dulse Seaweed Soda Bread is delicious and was more popular than the normal bread I baked for an event, so I thought I’d share it here. The basis of this recipe came from my sister (the gluten-free […]

Take it To the Edge – Seaweeding for Adventurers

Take it To the Edge – Seaweeding for Adventurers

“One way to get the most out of life is to look upon it as an adventure.” William Feather   Life’s an adventure isn’t it?! And adventures can come in all shapes and sizes, from trying a new food to exploring a new place, to […]

Wild Garlic and Seaweed Oil (inspired by Nathan Outlaw)

Wild Garlic and Seaweed Oil (inspired by Nathan Outlaw)

Here in Cornwall, three-cornered leek (allium triquetrium) is often called wild garlic. I don’t have a problem with that. I enjoy local names, to me, I associate it with locals taking ownership of the plants, land and so-called weeds surrounding them and I see that as a good thing.

(Allium triquetrium has long, thin leaves and stems which are triangular shaped and drooping white flowers)

As I live in Cornwall, I use ‘our’ wild garlic a lot, though you could use the true wild garlic, ransoms (allium ursinum) instead. Actually, I suggest you use the wild version that is easily available to you, and don’t worry about the rest.

For the last two years, I’ve had a quick chat with the Cornwall based chef, author and multi-restaurant owner Nathan Outlaw when he’s come down to Penzance to do a book signing of his latest book at the brilliant The Edge of the World Bookshop. An immensly energetic though laid-back, hard-working, kind and talented chef he’s always a pleasure to talk wild food with.

I now have Nathan’s Everyday Seafood Book in my, very small, cookbook shelf and ocassionally flick through it for inspiration and recipe ideas. It’s always the Sea Lettuce (Ulva lactuca) oil that stands out to me, partly because of its brilliant colour, of course because it uses wild food, and also because it is very simple and easy to make.

(Sea lettuce seaweed, ulva lactuca, looks as you would imagine – like lettuce)

I decided to have a go at my own version – because I’m me, and I like to tweak things, and because, well you can find Nathan Outlaw’s seaweed oil recipe in his book (see link above), so I thought I’d offer something else here.

Flavouring an oil is a great way to capture a wild aroma long after its season has passed. This oil will continue to mature once in your store cupboard and I suggest using it within 3 months.

Both three-cornered leek (aka wild garlic) and sea lettuce seaweed are rich in nutrients and health giving properties, including vitamin C, B vitamins, iron and immune boosting goodness. Spring is the best time for wild garlic and sea lettuce is good in spring or summer, or used dried. Below I use rapeseed oil – I had it in my cupboard, and hey, it’s local too!

Wild Garlic and Seaweed Oil Recipe

Drizzle over soup, bread, cheese on toast, use it to cook spanish omelettes or to fry eggs in. Basically you can use it raw or in cooking.

Ingredients

400ml cold-pressed rapeseed oil

1 handful sea lettuce, fresh or rehydrated from dried

Small handful of three-cornered leek

Drop the sea lettuce and three-cornered leek into boiling water for 30 seconds, remove and plunge immediately into ice cold water. Squeeze out all the excess liquid and blend with the oil. Store in a dark cupboard and use within 3 months.

Gorse Flower and Sargassum Seaweed Foccacia

Gorse Flower and Sargassum Seaweed Foccacia

Part of the fun of foraging for me is coming home with a wonderful choice of unusual ingredients to cook and create with, or drying them to use another day. In my kitchen pretty much anything goes, of course there have been disasters along the […]

Can Seaweeds Survive the Frost and Snow?

Can Seaweeds Survive the Frost and Snow?

Yesterday I was crunching on frosty kelp, today defrosted and in the sun, it’s a lot for seaweeds to cope with, or is it?   In reverence to seaweed, and in celebration of the ‘proper’ snow we had 2 weeks ago (the first time in […]

Three Seaweed Soup with an Inner Kick

Three Seaweed Soup with an Inner Kick

I’ve been reading in this Saturday’s Guardian how Thomasina Miers has been supping lots of soup so far this year, and I feel like saying ‘me too‘, though not for the same reasons many women have validly and valiantly been saying this across continents.

Tommi Mier’s restaurant chain Wahaca specialise in Mexican food, and while this isn’t a Mexican dish, it is definitely inspired by the spicy punch that Mexican food often has. My me too is about supping soups. Soups that are warming, healthy and bring people together, especially on a cold March morning. It’s been cold, too cold and soup is the perfect remedy, this one’s got a chilli kick to get your inner fire going, if it isn’t already by the outrageous scale of the #metoo movement and the injustices it highlights.

Back to the soup.

Fresh Kelp, Oarweed, Laminaria digitata

This soup using 3 locally foraged seaweeds;

  • Kelp (Laminaria digitata)
  • Sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima)
  • Sea spaghetti or Thongweed (Himanthalia elongata)

These could also be substituted for a mixture of;

  • any kelp seaweed (Dabberlocks, Oarweed, Furbelows, Wakame),
  • any wrack seaweed (Bladder wrack, Serrated or Toothed, Spiralled)
  • pepper dulse could also be used instead of black pepper for one layer of the ‘kick’.

Oh, by the way, kelp is called kombu in Japan, and the basis of this soup is similar to a vegan version of dashi stock which combines kombu and shitake mushrooms (and omits bonito flakes which are fish).

There is lots, lots more I could say about seaweed, and soups, though here I’ll keep it simple and just offer you this recipe.

Thongweed, Kelp and Sugar Kelp soakingThongweed, Kelp, Sugar Kelp

(Soaking the seaweed and straining off the ingredients for making the broth)

Three Seaweed Soup

A warming broth which is so simple to make and is great on its own or can be used as a base for a noodle soup or more of a substantial soup, broth or stew.

Ingredients

  • 12cm length of dried kelp (or 1/3 more if fresh)
  • 12 cm length of dried sugar kelp (or 1/3 more if fresh)
  • 10cm single length of sea spaghetti (or 1/3 more if fresh)
  • 2 litres boiling water
  • 1 medium onion, finely chopped
  • 3cm chunk of ginger root, chopped
  • Lots of freshly ground black pepper
  • small handful of dried chanterelle mushrooms
  • 1-1/2 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • soy sauce to taste

Cut all of the seaweeds into small pieces and place in a large pan. Add the boiling water, then all the rest of the ingredients, except the soy sauce. Place a lid on the pan and leave to simmer for 40 minutes. Place the mixture in a food processor and blend till the pieces are broken down, or strain if you prefer a clear broth. Add the soy sauce to taste. Serves 6 as a small bowl of soup, or 12 as a small starter/taster.

Seaweed broth with thongweed, kelp and sugar kelp

The finished Broth, before I ladle it into a hot food flask and take it to the beach to share with participants on a seaweed foraging course.

Edible Storm Debris? Sugar Kelp Seaweed after the Storm

Edible Storm Debris? Sugar Kelp Seaweed after the Storm

I’m often asked;  what seaweed can you eat? What about this stuff (pointing to the piles of spewed up seaweed on the beach that’s been turfed up by the powerful, stormy Winter waves). Hmm, no wonder people are put off eating seaweed. Not all seaweed […]

Foraging on the Isles of Scilly

Foraging on the Isles of Scilly

Unique Island Foraging Really, like nowhere else. Sudi Pigott, food journalist and author compared Gourmet Foraging and Dining on Scilly to an experience at Noma – Rene Redzepi’s  Copenhagen restaurant, which, at least twice has won best restaurant in the world awards (S. Pellegrino 50). […]