Tag: alexanders

A Day in the Life of a Forager

A Day in the Life of a Forager

It always feels odd arranging to meet a stranger in a car park. Though that is where I met photographer Rick Davy at the start of my working day. I was on a mission to collect a specific green, and I said to Rick that […]

Foraging: Free Gifts, Freely Given

Foraging: Free Gifts, Freely Given

It’s a fresh winter morning and I am sitting watching the sky lighten and the day begin. I am just sitting, doing nothing, while the day is offering nothing less than a performance. Blue sky starts to peek through, charcoal grey clouds move slowly in […]

Winter Creamy Alexander Soup (vegan)

Winter Creamy Alexander Soup (vegan)

I’ve just returned home from a winter foraging course where we covered 10 wilds that you can pick here in Cornwall through winter. I love foraging in the cooler months and there’s a great choice of wild pickings too. I’ve written about and sung the praises of winter foraging before in; Why Cornwall is excellent for foraging even in winter.

Smyrnium olusatrum

On the foraging course we shared the joys of being outside in nature, as well as some great tastes and a hot flask of Alexander Soup. I always make wild tasters for courses and soup felt fitting for December, as did using some of the abundant growing Alexanders (Smyrynium olusatrum).

All the soup was appreciatively devoured, though luckily I’d kept a portion at home to have for a late lunch. You can read and see lots more  – including recipes – about Alexanders in the Alexanders section of my blog.

Meanwhile, lets get to it. Here’s this delicious recipe which is so easy to make, good for you and seasonal here in Cornwall.

Smyrnium olusatrum

Winter Alexanders Soup (vegan)

Serves 4, generously

Ingredients 

  • 200g alexanders leaves (large stalks removed)
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 medium onion
  • 150g pots, diced (scrubbed, though not peeled)
  • 200g creamed coconut
  • 1250ml boiling water
  • 3 tsp powdered vegetable stock
  • salt and pepper

Finely chop the finer Alexander stems and put aside. In a medium saucepan, heat the oil over a medium heat, chop the onion and add to the sizzling oil, stir and cook until translucent. Lower the heat, add the potatoes and Alexander stems and sweat for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, measure out 1.25 litres of boiling water, roughly chop the cream coconut and place in a large, heat-proof bowl, pour the boiling water over the coconut, and stir until dissolved. Season with stock and salt and pepper. Chop the Alexander leaves and add to the pot, cook for 7-10 minutes, or until tender. Blend and serve, or pour into a hot flask and take to the beach for a hearty lunch.

Smyrnium olusatrum

How and Why to Cook with Alexanders

How and Why to Cook with Alexanders

The Romans valued the plant Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum) highly and brought it over with them to the British Isles almost 2,000 years ago to use as a pot herb. It was used widely before celery came into fashion (has celery really been in fashion?!). Celery […]

A Memorable Winter Foraging Menu

A Memorable Winter Foraging Menu

I’m often asked what my favourite time to forage is, well spring is fantastic, though honestly, winter is becoming an increasingly wonderful time to forage. The quiet, the abundance of plants and the unexpected joys of finding food (not in the supermarket) this time of […]

My Five Top Spring Wild Foods

My Five Top Spring Wild Foods

Spring is exciting – a combination of both warmth and light gets plants, animals and human-animals going. Sometimes, for me, too going. The term mad march hare feels too close to home for me, as I prance around the hedgerows picking wild greens as if there is no tomorrow, or as if spring won’t last forever, which of course it won’t. Lets face it, we’ve often being waiting a while for it to come too.

Many wild greens respond well to being plucked, for example when the tops of nettles are snipped off this stimulates more growth and leaf tops to grow. So below I’ve chosen 5 common wild foods that arrive every year, a plenty and are happy to be plucked, appreciated and eaten.

Here are my top 5 pickables (technical term :)) for this spring, I have loads of nuggets of information and recipes to share on each of them, though for now I’ll keep it brief.

My Top Five Spring Wild Foods

1. Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica

Never under-estimate a common plant, believe me, nettles are a valuable food and we are lucky to have them. Their nutrition and versatility makes them easy to use (just avoid being stung) and they are (in my humble opinion and according to nutritional facts) better for you than spinach or cabbage.

2. Wild Garlic Allium family

The wild onion, garlic and leek family is vast and too large to go into here, though their commonalities include a wonderful garlic taste (and smell), anti bacterial properties and support for the heart. The whole of the plant can be used and it can be used raw or cooked – raw is stronger. It is one of the key edibles of spring.

3. Cleavers/Goosegrass Galium aparine

Cleavers spread. They grow up to 1 metre long and can be collected without a bag (let them stick to you). The leaves are a wonderful spring cleanser and support the urinary and lymphatic system, though best cooked to avoid the not so pleasant hairy texture when raw and use in small amounts.

4. Alexanders Smyrnium olusatrum

Writing this from the south coast of Cornwall, alexanders are definitely on my list. Abundant and often considered an invasive (land managers around Bristol have also practically pleaded with me to pick and eat them too). Nutritious and versatile, if you just know how to use them and pick them early on in spring.

5. Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa

Sorrel sap is tart and lemony and at its best in spring, and once you get your eye in, you’ll start to see it everywhere. Delicious added to so many savoury and sweet dishes, though don’t eat too much as they contain oxalic acid which isn’t good to eat in large amounts. A little is fine though.

So there you have it, my five favourite wild greens, and yes greens are best in spring. Next spring, maybe I’ll share a different five, as there’s always more to share.

Forage and Cook: Alexanders

Forage and Cook: Alexanders

A quick and quirky video on Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum)      Let me show you more tips, share more recipes and tasters on my Wild Food Foraging Courses. Most spring courses include Alexanders (greens), and late summer and autumn courses include the Alexander seeds/

A Hearty Snack – Savoury Alexander Muffins

A Hearty Snack – Savoury Alexander Muffins

I love muffins. Easy to cook and more substantial than bread. They’re also versatile – you can add almost anything (sweet or savoury), and so tasty you can just eat them on their own. I like them as an afternoon snack while working at the […]

Alexanders and Three-Cornered Leek Frittata

Alexanders and Three-Cornered Leek Frittata

Spring has been creeping in, in some places slowly, and others faster. The telling signs of birds carrying nesting material, lighter mornings and the fresh green plant life in the landscape all help us soften and brighten as Winter is left behind.

If you’re reading this in the UK and wondering what I’m taking about – perhaps where you live Winter still feels like it has it’s grip. Well, I’m writing from West Cornwall, and yes, our milder climate tends to be ahead of many areas, even just a little further north of here.

Two common, abundant and often cursed (both these plants are considered invasive weeds) edible Spring plants in Cornwall are Alexanders Smyrnium olusatrum and Three Cornered Leek Allium Triquetrium. Picking, eating and even digging these plants up*, are normally received with appreciation. On that note, and in the spirit of Spring abundance, I’ve created and offer this recipe to you.

A bunch of young alexander leaves and stems

Alexanders and Three Cornered Leek Frittata

Makes 8 slices (4 main courses or 8 snacks)

Ingredients 

400g Cornish Potatoes

2 tablespoons Olive Oil

75g Alexanders (leaves and young stems, chopped)

75g Three Cornered Leek (leaves, stems and roots, if available, all finely chopped)

5 organic or free-range local eggs, beaten

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Peel, dice and cook the potatoes in plenty of water, for about 10 minutes or until just cooked. You’ll be able to place a knife through the potatoes easily, though not so soft that the potatoes fall apart. Strain off the liquid and return to the pan on a low heat for a minute, just to evaporate off any remaining liquid.

Heat the oil in a saucepan  approximately 25cm across in size, over a medium heat. When the oil is hot, add the potatoes, alexanders and salt and pepper and fry for about 8 minutes, turning to fry on each side, when needed. Some of the potatoes will be golden brown after this time.

Briefly mix in the eggs and three-cornered leek, ensuring that the mixture is evenly spread across the pan. Cook for a further 8 minutes, or until the eggs are almost set.

 

Place under the grill for 2-3 minutes to set and and turn the frittata golden. You can carefully slice and serve while warm, or when cold.

Serve as part of a main meal with a luscious salad, or eat as a snack.

 

*Permission is needed from the land owner to dig up plants, otherwise you are breaking the law.

Why Cornwall is a Great Place to Forage in Winter

Why Cornwall is a Great Place to Forage in Winter

It’s deep December and I’m standing outside. Actually, there’s 8 of us standing outside and waiting for the one that’s gone astray. Once we’re all congregated, we begin. There’s something innately quiet about walking in Winter, as if all around us is sleeping, and in […]