Wild Garlic and Seaweed Oil (inspired by Nathan Outlaw)

Wild Garlic and Seaweed Oil (inspired by Nathan Outlaw)

Here in Cornwall, three-cornered leek (allium triquetrium) is often called wild garlic. I don’t have a problem with that. I enjoy local names, to me, I associate it with locals taking ownership of the plants, land and so-called weeds surrounding them and I see that as a good thing.

(Allium triquetrium has long, thin leaves and stems which are triangular shaped and drooping white flowers)

As I live in Cornwall, I use ‘our’ wild garlic a lot, though you could use the true wild garlic, ransoms (allium ursinum) instead. Actually, I suggest you use the wild version that is easily available to you, and don’t worry about the rest.

For the last two years, I’ve had a quick chat with the Cornwall based chef, author and multi-restaurant owner Nathan Outlaw when he’s come down to Penzance to do a book signing of his latest book at the brilliant The Edge of the World Bookshop. An immensly energetic though laid-back, hard-working, kind and talented chef he’s always a pleasure to talk wild food with.

I now have Nathan’s Everyday Seafood Book in my, very small, cookbook shelf and ocassionally flick through it for inspiration and recipe ideas. It’s always the Sea Lettuce (Ulva lactuca) oil that stands out to me, partly because of its brilliant colour, of course because it uses wild food, and also because it is very simple and easy to make.

(Sea lettuce seaweed, ulva lactuca, looks as you would imagine – like lettuce)

I decided to have a go at my own version – because I’m me, and I like to tweak things, and because, well you can find Nathan Outlaw’s seaweed oil recipe in his book (see link above), so I thought I’d offer something else here.

Flavouring an oil is a great way to capture a wild aroma long after its season has passed. This oil will continue to mature once in your store cupboard and I suggest using it within 3 months.

Both three-cornered leek (aka wild garlic) and sea lettuce seaweed are rich in nutrients and health giving properties, including vitamin C, B vitamins, iron and immune boosting goodness. Spring is the best time for wild garlic and sea lettuce is good in spring or summer, or used dried. Below I use rapeseed oil – I had it in my cupboard, and hey, it’s local too!

Wild Garlic and Seaweed Oil Recipe

Drizzle over soup, bread, cheese on toast, use it to cook spanish omelettes or to fry eggs in. Basically you can use it raw or in cooking.

Ingredients

400ml cold-pressed rapeseed oil

1 handful sea lettuce, fresh or rehydrated from dried

Small handful of three-cornered leek

Drop the sea lettuce and three-cornered leek into boiling water for 30 seconds, remove and plunge immediately into ice cold water. Squeeze out all the excess liquid and blend with the oil. Store in a dark cupboard and use within 3 months.



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