Foraging on the Isles of Scilly

Foraging on the Isles of Scilly

Unique Island Foraging

Really, like nowhere else.

Sudi Pigott, food journalist and author compared Gourmet Foraging and Dining on Scilly to an experience at Noma – Rene Redzepi’s  Copenhagen restaurant, which, at least twice has won best restaurant in the world awards (S. Pellegrino 50). Noma specialises in using foraged and seasonal produce and has a world renown reputation.

According to Sudi, we were on a level with Noma (Daily Express, 2011).

Travelling to the Isles of Scilly always feels magical to me. I couldn’t get much closer really (well not much) and still live on the mainland. The Scillonian ferry is 10 minutes walk away from my house, and standing in the right place I could watch the boat leave and return daily, in season.

Foraging can appeal to such a wide reach of people, from foodies to wildlife enthusiasts, and Scilly really is the perfect environment for it. A series of islands, low population numbers and a priority for wildlife including birds, plants and sea life, plus a distinct lack of cars and motor vehicles is ideal for foraging to flourish in the clean air and land. Indeed, foraging has happened a-plenty in Scilly in the past, piles of empty limpet shells on (the now uninhabited island of Samson) pays testament to that.

(The Foragers: Hell Bay Gourmet Foraging and Dining Break, Isles of Scilly)

And what about now? Like elsewhere in the UK, foraging has largely been forgotten, and the Coop (the largest food shop on Scilly) is perhaps an over-used substitute for the wild stuff. Local foods are still used though, when available. Though I can’t help casting my eye across all those beautiful fresh ingredients, forgotten in the hedgerow, fields and coastline.

When I first approach Hell Bay with the idea of doing gourmet foraging events, I wanted the best. The best chef, environment and eating experience that would allow the wild ingredients to really be appreciated for what they are – special.  Special, abundant and worth rediscovering.

Our group of enthusiast guests, felt similarly (I hoped), and joined me for 3 days, 3 islands, 3 walks and 3, 5 course gourmet dinners – including the ingredients we’d foraged during the day. Travelling from various areas of the UK, foraging became our common ground, oh, and discussions about the hotel’s enviable art collection.

We may not have looked like foragers, though looks aren’t everything, and in a way, foraging was just the medium we used –  the chosen lense to appreciate the islands and the natural abundance they had to offer. Indeed, both people’s adventurous spirits, and the wild plants themselves came up trumps, my favourite being when we focused on the seashore…

Foraging for seaweeds is tide dependent and on the islands it is also dependent on the times of the boats. On our final day of foraging we got the boat to St Martins island.  A sensitive juggling; this wasn’t the first time we’d got dropped at the opposite end of the island to expected and planned for! A low tide is perfect for seaweed foraging, though not for mooring boats – oh well, we got to the island, were wellied up, well some of us, while others dared it with bare feet or trainers.  Thankfully the coastline of St Martins came up with the goods.

It amazes me that pottering around just one collection of rocks enabled us to forage for a wide range of seaweeds to accompany our dinner.

Sea Spaghetti before harvesting for supper

I had a ‘shopping list’ of 7 seaweeds, which we snipped off with scissors and took, happily back to the hotel kitchen. Idyll memories of aisles of sandy beaches, rock pools, paddling expeditions and a little clambering, looking under kelp forests and getting faces up close to the splish, sploshing water around us. Those who chose to, watched from a distance, enjoying the sun while the wellied ones paddled out to find the freshest finds. We laid out are proud findings on the rocks (who ever took photos – I’d love a copy!) before revising their names and bundling them into our baskets before heading off to lunch.

The evening’s menu was always greeted with satisfying ooohs and aaahs – all the excitment you would expect from a special dinner party. I love that part – although we forage together, I like to keep the evening’s menu a surprise. It’s like revealing a new painting – we’ve worked creatively behind the scenes – myself helping design the menu and advise processes, then leaving the chefs to use their talents and skills to create 5 bespoke courses with a range of colours, textures and visual arrangements. Like art, food comes down to personal taste, though the variety and skill seemded to be enough to please everyone…

Hell Bay Hotel, Bryher, Isles of Scilly (our foraging base)

However.

Some dishes were a hit, while others had a mixed response that might be expected from more experimental cuisine. Personally, Sea Spaghetti (Spaghetti-like seaweed) with Grilled Turbot and pangretta with sea lettuce, followed by Rice Pudding with crystalised Alexander stems were hits with me. Though some disagreed! Other’s loved the hogweed seed biscuits that accompanied Cornish cheeses – for me, I was completely satisfied already and had no room for anymore. All created within the style and quality you expect at Hell Bay.

Unique Scilly foraging it is.

I could list all the dishes of each evening, though just as a taster, here’s the menu we enjoyed on our second evening after foraging on the Island of Tresco and an afternoon free to enjoy the Tresco Abbey Gardens.

  • Sorrel & Wall Oxalis Soup
  • Fennel Tempura Fillet of Hake, dressed White Crab Meat, steamed Rock Samphire,
  • Pan roasted fillet of Venison, Nettle Gnoochi, Frosted Orache, Three-cornered Leek puree, Chocolate & Yarrow Jus.
  • Gorse Flower Creme Brulee with Blackberry Leaf Sorbet
  • Cornish Cheeses with Hogweed & Alexander Seeded Biscuits

I offer bespoke foraging experiences on the Isles of Scilly, my availability is limited, and especially limited in high-season when the chefs are exceptionally busy. Luckily, foraging is best in early spring and autumn – do bear this inmind if you’d like to experience the wild side of these beautiful islands.



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